He went into hiding in 1996 and was finally arrested in 2008

Serbian capital, Belgrade. Karadzic was heavily disguised by a white beard, long

hair and spectacles, living under a false identity as a “spiritual healer.”

Karadzic is the highest-ranking political figure to have been brought to justice over the bitter ethnic conflicts of the 1990s.

Wednesday’s judgement was handed down by the UN’s international residual mechanism for cr

iminal tribunals, which deals with cases left over from the now dissolved courts for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

In November 2017 the court also sentenced former Bosnian Serb army leader Ratko Mladi

c to life in prison after finding him guilty of genocide for atrocities committed during the Bosnian war from 1992 to 1995.

Mladic was charged with two counts of genocide and nine crim

es against humanity and war crimes for his role in the conflict in the former Yugoslavia fro

m 1992 to 1995, during which 100,000 people were killed and another 2.2 million displaced.

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A Syrian refugee and his son are first victims to be buried in Chri

Christchurch, New Zealand (CNN)Zaid Mustafa should have been at school on Wednesday.

Instead, he was being pushed in a wheelchair to the graves of his father and brother,

surrounded by mourning strangers in a country he had only recently made home.

The 13-year-old was shot in the leg last Friday when a gunman opened fire on worshipers at two mosques in the New Zeala

nd city of Christchurch, killing 50 people and shocking a nation that thought it could never happen there.

The Mustafas didn’t think it could happen there, either.Zaid Mustafa, 13, whose father and brother were killed in the Chri

stchurch terrorist attack, attends a funeral at Memorial Park Cemetery on March 20, 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Khaled, 44, and Hamza, 15, were at Al Noor Mosque on Deans Ave

nue when they were gunned down, leaving behind Zaid, his mother, Salwa, and younger sister, Zaina.

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approaching a European Council summit where thebehavior of

the EU can’t easily be predicted.

The difficulty for the EU is that, long or short, any delay comes with complications. And this is where opinions in European capitals start to diverge.

If the UK hasn’t left the EU by May 22, it might have to take part in elections to the European Parli

amentary elections, which begin the following day. Not doing so could be a breach of the UK’s obligations as a

member state.And if that happens, there is a real concern in Brussels that hardline Euroskeptics could stand for elect

ion, in protest at Britain not yet having yet Brexited. They might find a receptive public, and in turn, join interesting new fr

iends in the European Parliament. Sound far fetched? An EU source recently told CNN of worries in Brussels that far-right figures like To

mmy Robinson could end up as Members of the European Parliament, with all the associated attention that brings.

So a short delay is the preferred option of many in Brussels, especially in the Parliament. But that brings its own set of issues. Fi

rst, there is no guarantee that by the end of it, the UK Parliament would have given a thumbs up to May’s deal. In reality, it cou

ld just mean a delay to a no-deal Brexit that almost everyone claims they want to avoid, but still remains the default legal position.

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This progressive reputation — Ardern has also supporte

  and called for cannabis decriminalization — made i

t all the more shocking when the country was the subject of a far-right terrorist attack.

  ”I’ve said many times that we are a nation of 200 ethnicities, 160 languages,” Ardern s

aid Tuesday. “We open our doors to others and say welcome. The only thing that must change after the e

vents of Friday is that this same door must close on all of those who espouse hate and fear.”

  CNN’s James Griffiths contributed reporting from Hong

Kong.The bodies of at least six victims of the Christchurch attack were returned to families Tuesday and

another 32 people remain in hospital after a 28-year-old Australian gunman opened fire at two mosques last week.

  New Zealand Police told CNN in a statement that they were wo

rking with families to return their loved ones’ bodies after a coroner had identified 12 victims.

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st time voter Eshna Kutty, 22, wants India’s next leader to giv

  a voice to all the nation’s many minorities.

  ”I am Hindu, I come from a privileged background, so for people like me, no matter which part

y comes to power, we aren’t going to face the brunt of it. The most affected are the minorities and

the poor… If a certain party comes to power, these people will face huge problems.

  ”They are the people I want to keep in mind when I choose a party.”

  For Aastha Kulshrestha, a 23-year-old law student from New Delhi, her expectation of the n

ext government is that it should not pit one group or religion against the other. “It is a great impe

diment to the growth of the nation, a nation that is democratic, socialist and a republic,” she told CNN.

  ”If you want to make a change… you vote”oung voters could have a huge influence on the

outcome. For some, casting their ballot is an exciting “coming of age” moment. But many are disenchanted.

  John Simte, 22, a law student in Bengaluru, says he is “thrilled to be a part of the world’s la

rgest democratic project.” He admits a “deep sense of apathy” amongst his peers but is nonetheless optimistic.

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It (political apathy) has seeped into their minds because

  of the kind of politics the parties do. Going forward, it is important to restore confidence in the electoral system we have,” Simte said.

  ”The moment we restore that confidence, there will be a social and political tran

sformation. More people will come out and vote, more people will stand for elections.”

  Mumbai-based student Kutty believes “voting gives you the right to critique the government.”

  ”If you want to make a change, you cannot just complain about it — you do your part and you vote,” she said.

  Kulshrestha, from New Delhi, wholeheartedly agrees.

  ”It is absolutely pertinent that every citizen exercises their right. It is very easy to later sob about the policies of the govern

ment and the socio-political climate of the country if you haven’t actively done anything to change it,” she said.

shj419.com

At one point in the meeting Tump, said he wasn’t going to

  ”comment on Brexit,” but characteristically unable to constrain himself, could barely leave the topic alone.

  At the start of his meeting, Trump welcomed Varadkar, and pointin

g out that his visitor was in a difficult position over Britain’s tortured attempts to com

plete its withdrawal from the European Union, which could harm Ireland’s peace and prosperity.

  Trump also, as he often does, used his position to slyly shout out one of his businesses, in this case, a golf course in Ireland.

  ”I have a very warm spot for Doonbeg, I will tell you that and it just a great place really.”

  While praising Ireland, Trump promptly switched to a characteristic boast about his own success, his mana

gement of the economy and how he held “all of the records … every single record for the stock market.”

  Trump’s obsession with Obama — a defining characteristic — app

eared like a nervous tick twice in his photo-op, twinned with a willingness to spout untruths.

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He also repeated the untruth that he predicted the result of

  when he flew into his Turnberry golf course in 2016. In fact, Trump

arrived on the west coast of Scotland hours after the result of the referendum was announced.

  Whether the President knows he’s lying, or has convinced himself of the truth of his a

lternative reality, is unclear. But his continued use of a discredited fact is a core element of his political technique.

  Trump also put Varadkar on the spot — asking h

im to comment on Brexit, threatening to expose their differences on the issue.

  Then Trump interrupted Varadkar, who watched with a bemuse

d look as the President savaged the EU alongside one of its national leaders.

  ”The European Union treats us very, very unfairly,” Trump said, i

n a screed that included another characteristic political device — a flagrant threat.

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The KC-46 plays a critical role in the refueling of military aircra

  William and Kate, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and Harry and Meghan, The Duk

e and Duchess of Sussex, have said they have all spent time in Christchurch and

its “open-hearted and generous” people.

  They condemned the violence on the Muslim community, calling it

“horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.”

  ”No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship,” the royal couples said in a statement.

  Here’s the full statement:

  Our hearts go out to the families and friends of the people who lost their lives in the devastating attack in Christchurch.

  We have all been fortunate to spend time in Christchurch and have felt the

warm, open-hearted and generous spirit that is core to its remarkable people.

  No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship.

  This senseless attack is an affront to the people of Christchurch and New Zealand, and the bro

ader Muslim community. It is a horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.

  We know that from this devastation and deep mourning, the people of New

Zealand will unite to show that such evil can never defeat compassion and tolerance.

  We send our thoughts and prayers to everyone in New Zealand today.

njyw419.com 

One witness, who did not want to be named, said he was

  driving by the scene and saw a man with a “with his 3- or 4-year-old

daughter” who had been shot in the back.

  ”He was screaming like get her to the hospital and the ambulance couldn’t come in until it was secured so I just got my truck a

nd loaded up him, and his daughter, and this other guy had been shot in the leg,

and took them to the hospital,” he said.

  One man outside the mosque said that he prayed that the gunman would “run out of bullets.”

  ”I was thinking that he must run out bullets you know, so what I did was

basically waiting and praying to God, oh God please

let this guy run out of bullets,” he said. He said a man told him to remain still

and then the gunman shot the man “straight in the chest.”Christchurch was put

on lockdown, with all schools and council buildings shut and roads closed across the city.

  By 6 p.m. local time New Zealand police said the lockdown on schools had been lifted.

  Police can now confirm the lock down of schools throughout Christchurch has been lifted. We would like

to reassure members of the public that there is a large Police presence in the city

and the safety of the community is our priority.

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